First Guided Afternoon Bird Walk

The first afternoon bird walk I led this Wednesday was a success! 8 people came out and we birded Centennial Woods from 2 to 4pm. Before we had even reached Centennial, we came across a flock of about a dozen robins in the crabapple trees lining the sidewalk near the windmill. We stopped to watch these for a while as they carefully flew around the trees and tried to tear off pieces of the small red fruits. I kept an eye out for another winter fruit eater, the Cedar Waxwing, but none were found mixed in with the flock.

Once we had made it down to the entrance, we stopped to admire a small flock of about half a dozen Dark-eyed Juncos moving around the edge of the woods. They were foraging in the tall grasses and making high-pitched contact calls until we spooked them walking down the trail into the woods. Not much was seen walking through the first part of Centennial, but a flurry of activity near the large open marshy area let us know that we were close to one of the bird feeders! Several Black-capped Chickadees and a White-breasted Nuthatch were hanging around the feeder, we watched as the chickadees would fly in, grab a single sunflower seed, and fly away to a perch where they could methodically hammer away at the seed until they reached the tasty center. While we were distracted by the activity at the feeder, two circling Red-tailed Hawks snuck up on us, only to start riding thermals directly above our heads for our viewing pleasure. We watched as they circled for a few minutes until both tucked in their wings and left the thermal to search for another one.

The rest of the trip was fairly uneventful, until we came across the second feeder on our way out of the woods. There was also a lot of chickadee activity here, as well as some more White-breasted Nuthatches and a few Tufted Titmice as well. The star of the show at the second feeder however was a pair of Hairy Woodpeckers that put on quite a show for everyone in the group. They seemed almost fearless, flying around within a few feet of the group, allowing us to get a good look at the bright red patch on the back of the males head, as well as some of the field marks that can be used to differentiate between Hairy and Downy Woodpeckers. This second bird-rich area was a great ending to this Centennial trip and a great chance for the group to practice bird ID. I'm looking forward to next weeks trip!

Posted by nsharp nsharp, February 03, 2016 16:38

Observations

Photos / Sounds

No photos or sounds

What

American Crow Corvus brachyrhynchos

Observer

nsharp

Date

February 2, 2016

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

American Robin Turdus migratorius

Observer

nsharp

Date

February 2, 2016

Photos / Sounds

No photos or sounds

What

European Starling Sturnus vulgaris

Observer

nsharp

Date

February 2, 2016

Photos / Sounds

No photos or sounds

What

Dark-eyed Junco Junco hyemalis

Observer

nsharp

Date

February 2, 2016

Photos / Sounds

No photos or sounds

What

Downy Woodpecker Dryobates pubescens

Observer

nsharp

Date

February 2, 2016

Photos / Sounds

No photos or sounds

What

Black-capped Chickadee Poecile atricapillus

Observer

nsharp

Date

February 2, 2016

Photos / Sounds

What

Hairy Woodpecker Dryobates villosus

Observer

nsharp

Date

February 2, 2016

Photos / Sounds

No photos or sounds

What

White-breasted Nuthatch Sitta carolinensis

Observer

nsharp

Date

February 2, 2016

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Red-tailed Hawk Buteo jamaicensis

Observer

nsharp

Date

February 2, 2016

Photos / Sounds

No photos or sounds

What

Tufted Titmouse Baeolophus bicolor

Observer

nsharp

Date

February 2, 2016

Photos / Sounds

No photos or sounds

What

Rock Pigeon Columba livia

Observer

nsharp

Date

February 2, 2016

Photos / Sounds

No photos or sounds

What

Mourning Dove Zenaida macroura

Observer

nsharp

Date

February 2, 2016

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Mallard Anas platyrhynchos

Observer

nsharp

Date

February 2, 2016

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