Field Observation #6

Time: 1:30 pm
Date: 22 April 2019
Location: Intervale Community Farm natural trail area

One distinct behavior I observed that I had not yet encountered this year was an animated exchange between two chickadees. They were somewhere high in the tree canopy and the birds were calling back and forth, back and forth for several minutes without (it seemed) even taking a breath. I had never heard two chickadees talking to each other like that, so it was really interesting to observe. I am not positive if that behavior is indicative of mating season. Maybe two males were talking to each other and establishing some territory. It was neat to hear a conversation between two birds. Chickadee nesting habitat is usually in birch trees and alder trees, and there were many of those in the Intervale woods. House Sparrows were spending time in low brushy thickets, threading in and out of the patches of branches. I wonder if they were foraging for materials for their nests. The house sparrows seemed to pair up and then break off and pair up again. I am not sure what kind of mating behavior house sparrows partake in, but maybe the small group was made up of males and females who were getting acquainted with one another, or possibly a group of mostly males who were sizing one another up. This type of highly interactive behavior seems typical of the early spring days. The last species I noticed possibly working on their nesting habitat was a Pileated Woodpecker. They were high in a tree drumming away, which might have been to forage for food, or it might have been to construct a nesting cavity. A woodpecker's nest habitat is different from a chickadee in their tree or a House Sparrow in narrow crevices of buildings or birdhouses because they build their nest inside an excavated hole in a tree.

Mini-activity: I heard 6 different species, but there was only 1 individual for each. I still cannot identify one sound I heard. It was a 2 second song and the bird sang every 15 or 20 seconds consistently for more than 6 or 7 minutes. There were 3 parts to the song (a high, swooping check mark, a low chatter, and a series of high cheep-cheep-cheeps. It was really nice to do this activity and I want to do the same thing when I can barely make out the individual sounds of 10 or more species in a true cacophony.

Posted by jess-savage jess-savage, April 23, 2019 03:53

Observations

Photos / Sounds

No photos or sounds

What

Brown Creeper Certhia americana

Observer

jess-savage

Date

April 22, 2019

Photos / Sounds

No photos or sounds

What

Tufted Titmouse Baeolophus bicolor

Observer

jess-savage

Date

April 22, 2019

Photos / Sounds

No photos or sounds

What

Herring Gull Larus argentatus

Observer

jess-savage

Date

April 22, 2019

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

American Robin Turdus migratorius

Observer

jess-savage

Date

April 22, 2019

Photos / Sounds

No photos or sounds

What

House Sparrow Passer domesticus

Observer

jess-savage

Date

April 22, 2019

Photos / Sounds

No photos or sounds

What

Black-capped Chickadee Poecile atricapillus

Observer

jess-savage

Date

April 22, 2019

Photos / Sounds

No photos or sounds

What

Pileated Woodpecker Dryocopus pileatus

Observer

jess-savage

Date

April 22, 2019

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