April 23, 2019

Pluteus observed in the Mangemangeroa Reserve - Pluteus sp. ‘Yellow NZ'

The cap of this species can appear similar to Pluteus readiarum. In the Mangemangeroa Reserve this species can be distinguished in the field from Pluteus readiarum by the cream stipe and the gill lamellae which extend all the way to the cap margin. (The variety of Pluteus readiarum which is seen in the Mangemangeroa Reserve has a tan stipe along its entire length and the cap margin exceeds the gill lamellae). The dark squamules on the cap surface are more uniformly distributed over the surface of the cap whereas for Pluteus readiarum the dark squamules are typically arranged in a network pattern although this can be variable.

Description: The cap has yellow tones with brown squamules. The fruit bodies are convex, occasionally becoming flatter with age and typically grow 3-5 cm in diameter but have been observed growing up to 6.5 cm in diameter. The gills are yellow-pink and extend all the way to the cap margin. The stipe is cream to yellow and may have tan-brown squamules towards the base. Microscopically the cap cells are somewhat shorter and narrower than for P. readiarum and typically have a rounded apex. Pleurocystidia are variable but narrow bottle-shaped pleurocystidia are often seen.

Abundance: Commonly observed in the Mangemangeroa Reserve.

Acknowledgement: J.A. Cooper

Posted on April 23, 2019 00:34 by codfish codfish | 7 observations | 0 comments | Leave a comment

April 22, 2019

Pluteus observed in the Mangemangeroa Reserve - Pluteus sp. ‘Mangemangeroa’

Microscopically the pileipellis terminal cells are similar to Pluteus perroseus but the stipe of these fruit bodies was quite yellow in colour.

Description: This medium sized Pluteus species has a dark brown velvety cap surface with dark raised squamules which are very dense in the centre. The gills are cream-pink in colour with a fine dark edge. The fruit bodies grow up to 4-5 cm in diameter. The stipe is quite yellow in colour with ‘fibrils’ projecting out from the stipe in tiny scattered groups.

Abundance: Rarely observed in the Mangemangeroa Reserve.

Acknowledgement: J.A. Cooper

Posted on April 22, 2019 23:51 by codfish codfish | 1 observations | 0 comments | Leave a comment

Pluteus observed in the Mangemangeroa Reserve - Pluteus sp. ‘Lepiota-like’

Microscopically the pileipellis terminal cells of this species are similar to Pluteus cf. hispidilacteus. It differs in that the fruit bodies are larger and may be found growing on both soil and wood and the terminal pileipellis cells are pigmented.

Description: This small Pluteus has a cap that is convex becoming flat and may have a small depression in the centre with raised dark black-brown fibrils over a lighter coloured cap. It has been observed growing up to 2.5 cm in diameter. The gills are cream-pink with a concolorous gill edge. The stipe is cream-grey.

Abundance: Rarely observed in the Mangemangeroa Reserve.

Acknowledgement: J.A. Cooper and P.R. Johnston

Posted on April 22, 2019 23:45 by codfish codfish | 2 observations | 0 comments | Leave a comment

Pluteus observed in the Mangemangeroa Reserve and Hunua Ranges - Pluteus velutinornatus

Pluteus velutinornatus

Horak describes this species with distinctive olive-green colours and with pleurocystidia with distinctive short finger-like projections.

The cap of this species can be variable. The most common presentation in the Mangemangeroa Reserve is of brown ‘wet’ fruit bodies with bumps on the cap surface and a scurfy centre. Occasionally fruit bodies are seen which are lighter and more grey in colour and with a more fibrous appearance. The stipe and gills of both of these variations are similar. It may be that the amount of rainfall at the time of fruiting affects the appearance of the mature cap. The juvenile fruit bodies are a dark grey-brown colour.

Description: The fruit bodies of this species are either dark brown or lighter grey-brown in colour with the appearance of appressed fibrils radiating out from the centre of the cap and with or without bumps on the cap surface and a scurfy centre. They are typically 5-6 cm in diameter but can grow up to 9.5 cm in diameter. The gills are beige to light tan becoming more beige-pink with age and have a darker edge. The stipe is grey-brown and fibrous with a bulbous base and green coloration visible especially towards the base.

Abundance: Commonly observed in the Mangemangeroa Reserve.

The population of Pluteus velutinornatus that I have observed in the Hunua Ranges has smaller fruit bodies which are lighter in colour than those seen in the Mangemangeroa Reserve but still with the distinctive green coloration.

Acknowledgement: J.A. Cooper

Posted on April 22, 2019 23:37 by codfish codfish | 6 observations | 0 comments | Leave a comment

Pluteus observed in the Mangemangeroa Reserve - Pluteus cf. thomsonii

From http://www.mushroomexpert.com/pluteus_thomsonii.html:
Pluteus thomsonii is a small, brown-capped species of Pluteus with a cap surface that often becomes elaborately veined. Under the microscope, its cheilocystidia are "rostrate" (featuring a single, finger-like to beak-like apical projection).

Description: The cap of this small Pluteus is pink-tan in colour with distinctive wrinkles in raised ridges in the centre of the cap. It grows up to 2.5 cm in diameter. The gills are cream-pink. The stipe is cream in colour and it has a light powdery covering. Microscopically the cheilocystidia are rostrate with a single projection of varying length and the cap cells are distinctive.

This species can be distinguished in the field (in the Mangemangeroa Reserve) as it is the only small species with the distinctive wrinkling associated with 'Celluloderma' species of Pluteus that grows on wood and has a pruinose stipe.

Abundance: Occasionally observed in the Mangemangeroa Reserve.

Posted on April 22, 2019 23:12 by codfish codfish | 2 observations | 0 comments | Leave a comment

Pluteus observed in the Mangemangeroa Reserve - Pluteus Sect. Celluloderma on soil (cf. terricola)

Description: This small Pluteus species grows on soil and has a velvety, wrinkled cap which is a warm-brown colour. The cap is less than 2 cm in diameter. The margin of the cap is marked with parallel grooves or striations and can appear sulcate in larger fruit bodies. The gills are cream-pink with a concolorous gill edge and the stipe is smooth and cream in colour with tan or grey hints.

Abundance: Frequently observed in the Mangemangeroa Reserve.

Acknowledgement: J.A. Cooper

Posted on April 22, 2019 23:00 by codfish codfish | 2 observations | 0 comments | Leave a comment

Pluteus observed in the Mangemangeroa Reserve - Pluteus Sect. Celluloderma on wood (cf. terricola)

Horak’ describes Pluteus terricola from soil.

I have observed two species with a pileipellis of subglobse to ellipsoid cells however they differ in appearance in the field, in substrate preference and in microscopic features. This species which is found on wood more closely matches the described Pluteus terricola but it is unlikely that it is this species.

Description: The cap of this species is a uniform rich-brown colour with a slightly raised centre and with wrinkling in raised ridges over the cap surface. It grows on wood and can be up to 2.5 cm in diameter. The gills are cream-pink with a concolorous gill margin. The stipe is cream with tan hints.

Abundance: Occasionally observed in the Mangemangeroa Reserve.

Acknowledgement: J.A. Cooper

Posted on April 22, 2019 22:56 by codfish codfish | 2 observations | 0 comments | Leave a comment

Pluteus observed in the Mangemangeroa Reserve - Pluteus similis

Description: The cap of this large species is dark brown in colour with tiny pyramidal-spinose scales on the cap surface. I have observed only a single mature fruit body with a cap of 9.4 cm in diameter. The gills are beige-pink with a dark edge. The stipe has dark fibrils covering the entire length.

Abundance: Rarely observed in the Mangemangeroa Reserve.

Posted on April 22, 2019 20:25 by codfish codfish | 1 observations | 0 comments | Leave a comment

Pluteus observed in the Mangemangeroa Reserve - Pluteus readiarum

Horak describes the stipe of Pluteus readiarum as being at first whitish but becoming pale yellow or buff in aged specimens and many of the images of this species available in the New Zealand Fungi and Bacteria (NZFungi) website do have a whitish stipe including some Horak images. The variety that I see in the Mangemangeroa Reserve always has a light tan stipe and the cap margin extends beyond the gills (although occasionally this is not obvious).

Description: The fruit bodies of this species can be quite variable in size. The cap is typically 3-6 cm in diameter but can grow up to 8 cm in diameter. The cap has yellow tones and dark squamules radiating outwards typically in a reticulated network pattern but not always. The young cap is convex becoming flat when mature and may be raised in the centre. The gills are cream-pink and the cap margin extends beyond the gills. The stipe is light tan, longitudinally ridged and is pruinose with a light powdery covering.

Microscopically the terminal cap cells are cylindrical, with a tapered apex or rounded apex and with brown pigment. These can be variable between individual fruit bodies, some with a mostly tapered apex and others with a mixture of rounded and tapered apex. Pleurocystidia are fusiform in shape overall, with a conical apex, thin-walled and appear lightly pigmented. Some pleurocystidia have a constriction below the apex with a single projection (as illustrated by Greta Stevenson). I have looked at the gills of many fruit bodies of this species and I have never seen any pleurocystidia with more than one projection.

Abundance: Commonly observed in the Mangemangeroa Reserve.

Acknowledgement: J.A. Cooper

Posted on April 22, 2019 20:19 by codfish codfish | 7 observations | 0 comments | Leave a comment

Pluteus perroseus

This medium sized species is easily identified by the dark brown velvety cap surface and very pink gills with a fine dark edge. The stipe is covered in brown fibrils and has a distinctive appearance.

This species has not been observed in the Mangemangeroa Reserve but has been observed in the Hunua Ranges.

Posted on April 22, 2019 19:54 by codfish codfish | 1 observations | 0 comments | Leave a comment

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